Making Homemade Chocolate

Make your own homemade chocolate candies and truffles with a chocolate mold and this simple recipe.

Making Homemade Chocolate
Chocolate by sflovestory via flickr
Overview
Few foods inspire the passion, devotion and cravings that chocolate can. Its velvety texture, rich creaminess and tantalizing sweetness draw many admirers. Those after a truly decadent chocolate experience may spend hundreds of dollars on gourmet chocolates but a similar experience can be created at home.

Handcrafting quality chocolates in one's own kitchen is a rewarding experience. Mastering the art of tempering and molding chocolate takes practice, but it is a skill well-worth developing.

After all, who doesn't appreciate a good piece of chocolate?

Tempering the Chocolate

Step 1
Place the chocolate on the cutting board and, starting at one corner of the block, use the chef's knife to chop the chocolate into 1/2-inch pieces (or smaller), cutting on a diagonal. Place 75 percent of the chopped chocolate in the glass bowl. Chop the remaining 25 percent into smaller pieces and set aside.
Step 2
Microwave the chocolate in the bowl at 1-minute intervals, with the microwave set to 50 percent power. Stir the chocolate with the rubber spatula between each interval and check its temperature. When the chocolate reaches 115 to 120 degrees F, remove it from the microwave, stir to remove any lumps and allow to cool for about 10 minutes.
Step 3
Stir the melted chocolate again. Add a handful of the chopped chocolate set aside earlier and stir until smooth. Stir in additional chocolate, if needed, until the melted chocolate reaches 86 degrees F for dark chocolate or 81 degrees F for milk or white chocolate.
Step 4
Raise the temperature of the chocolate to 89 degrees for dark chocolate or 86 for milk or white chocolate. Heat the bowl of chocolate in the microwave as outlined earlier, from 1 to 5 seconds (or more if needed, depending on the power of the microwave). When the chocolate reaches its appropriate temperature, it is tempered. When cooled, the chocolate will have an appealing sheen and a good snap when bitten. Use the chocolate immediately to preserve its temper.
Molding the Chocolate
Step 1
Fill each of the mold's cavities with chocolate using a teaspoon. Tap the mold on the counter gently to release any trapped air bubbles. Run the flat (non-sharp) edge of the knife across the mold to remove excess chocolate. The chocolate on the knife can be returned to the glass bowl.
Step 2
Let the chocolate set by placing the mold in a cool, dry place. The chocolates are ready to be released when they pull away from the mold slightly; the mold's cavities will look a bit gray.
Step 3
Remove the chocolates from the mold by quickly but carefully flipping the mold over on a flat surface and tapping firmly. The chocolate should pop out easily; if not, place the mold in the refrigerator or freezer for a few minutes and try again.
skill
4
ingredient
A block of quality chocolate (such as Callebaut, Guittard or Valrhona)

Chef's knife

Cutting board

Microwave-safe glass bowl

Rubber spatula

Instant read digital thermometer

Chocolate molds, cleaned and dried

ingredients
A block of quality chocolate (such as Callebaut, Guittard or Valrhona)
ingredients
Chef's knife
ingredients
Cutting board
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Microwave-safe glass bowl
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Rubber spatula
ingredients
Instant read digital thermometer
ingredients
Chocolate molds, cleaned and dried
tip
Work with chocolate in a cool, dry environment. Heat and humidity make tempering chocolate difficult.

Test the temper of the chocolate by pouring a line on a piece of parchment paper. Run your finger through the chocolate: If the line is clean and the chocolate holds its shape, it is tempered. If the chocolate appears grainy, oily or uneven, the chocolate is not tempered.

Different brands of chocolate have different melting, seeding and tempering temperatures. Consult the company's website for detailed information.

tips
Work with chocolate in a cool, dry environment. Heat and humidity make tempering chocolate difficult.
tips
Test the temper of the chocolate by pouring a line on a piece of parchment paper. Run your finger through the chocolate: If the line is clean and the chocolate holds its shape, it is tempered. If the chocolate appears grainy, oily or uneven, the chocolate is not tempered.
tips
Different brands of chocolate have different melting, seeding and tempering temperatures. Consult the company's website for detailed information.
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Resources
reference
Molding with Chocolate
resource
The Chocolate Mold Factory
resource
All Chocolate: For the Love of Chocolate