Vol.1, No.6
Our Solar System

What must happen before manned trips to other planets are possible?

Nasa expeditions to uranus

A history of the expeditions to venus


Photo Credit: Martin Adams

Featured Articles

The major constellations
astronomer-major-constellations

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The Space Issue

 A Letter From The Editor

As a child staring at the night sky, it's easy to think of the heavens as a vast miracle, mostly undiscovered and teeming with beauty. Perhaps the amazing part about the stars and the planets in our solar system, however, is the way further study shows this to be true. We know very little about the surface-workings of most of our neighbor planets, and what we do know ranges from fantastical explosions to ruggedly beautiful ice and rock. This issue explores the planets of our solar system. The information and facts go in depth for adults, or keep things light and simple for reading to and discussing with younger children. Other intriguing topics are explored, such as the possibility of manned trips to other planets, or another manned trip to our moon. Most excitingly, we have a few guides to get anyone started with using a telescope to enjoy the night sky.

Warmly,


Patricia Meyer
HappyNews Editor

 Our Solar System : Table of Contents

» The major constellations » Mars information for kids » Solar eclipse viewing schedule and information » Amateur astronomer: observing sun spots » Jupiter facts and information » Jupiter information for kids » Manned trips to the moon in the near future » What must happen before manned trips to other planets are possible? » Men who have walked on the moon » Mercury facts and information » Mercury information for kids » Nasa expeditions to uranus » A history of the expeditions to venus » Neptune facts and information » Neptune information for kids » Saturn facts and information » Saturn information for kids » Sun information for kids » How to test your telescope's optics » Uranus facts and information » Venus information for kids » How to watch an asteroid shower » How to watch a meteor shower