Seattle Mom Launches Movement to Make Halloween Child and Earth-Friendly
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NOVEMBER 01, 2007
By Press Release

With the child obesity crisis upon us, toys from China causing major worries and increasing awareness of our planet’s fragility, a Seattle-area mom, Corey Colwell-Lipson, has started a movement, Green Halloween, to create new child and Earth-friendly Halloween traditions.
“It’s time we start thinking outside the candy box,” says the mother of two girls. “Halloween doesn’t have to be about candy. Going junk-food-free can even be fun.”
Instead of candy, www.GreenHalloween.org, offers dozens of creative, inexpensive and even no-cost substitutes that young children will love. In addition, parents can go to the website to learn from experts how to talk to their children about moving toward a more healthy and Earth-friendly holiday, print out coloring pages, get ideas for healthy Halloween parties and find Green Halloween neighborhoods. Places to purchase earth-friendly and recycled items and how to dispose of unwanted candy are among the other ideas on the site.
Seattle area parents who are looking for Green Halloween homes for trick-or-treating or who wish to participate themselves, can search an interactive map or insert their location so others can find them. They also can print out a sheet to post in a window showing they are a Green Halloween home.
In its first month of operation, Green Halloween secured major sponsorship from Whole Foods Market, Overlake Hospital and Parent Map magazine. Many other sponsors also are involved. In addition, the Issaquah Highlands has come aboard as the first official Green Halloween neighborhood and parents around Seattle have expressed interest in turning their blocks green.
This year’s recipient of funds raised through Green Halloween activities, is Treeswing, a Seattle area non-profit committed to promoting children’s health through nutrition and exercise.
“This is just the beginning,” says Colwell-Lipson. “We’ve already had inquiries from people all over the country wanting to know how they can create a Green Halloween. Of course, individuals can do it just by checking out our website and making some simple changes. But next year we’ll roll out a nationwide initiative. After that, I expect to move on to other holidays. The idea of revolutionizing how we celebrate and create traditions in our country needs to change. People are starting to become aware of the damage we do to ourselves, our children and our environment without even realizing it. By making some easy, inexpensive changes, we can keep the excitement and fun in these celebrations, but do it in a more thoughtful and positive way.”

www.GreenHalloween.org